Panasonic GH3 Color Profiles

Today I shot a grey/color chart with the Panasonic GH3 at ISO 200, my new on-camera light “Kaiser Star Cluster” and the 12-35mm at f4.0, showing different picture settings at 0 0 0 0 with manual in-camera white balance matched to 5600K.

Based on the dynamic range that is visible on the grey chart, I’d choose NATURAL or PORTRAIT as a base for my future projects.
Furthermore I find the NATURAL and STANDARD colors most pleasing and accurate by default whereas NATURAL has a little less blue shift.

I additionally learned that with a correct manual white balance the camera adds a little too much blue so I’m going to consider that in my camera settings.

MONOCHROME

MONOCHROME

MONOCHROME color chart details

MONOCHROME color chart details

MONOCHROME grey chart details

MONOCHROME grey chart details

NATURAL

NATURAL

NATURAL color chart details

NATURAL color chart details

NATURAL grey chart details

NATURAL grey chart details

PORTRAIT

PORTRAIT

PORTRAIT color chart details

PORTRAIT color chart details

PORTRAIT grey chart details

PORTRAIT grey chart details

SCENERY

SCENERY

SCENERY color chart details

SCENERY color chart details

SCENERY grey chart details

SCENERY grey chart details

STANDARD

STANDARD

STANDARD color chart details

STANDARD color chart details

STANDARD grey chart details

STANDARD grey chart details

VIVID

VIVID

VIVID color chart details

VIVID color chart details

VIVID grey chart details

VIVID grey chart details

 

GH3 COLOR OVERVIEW

GH3 COLOR OVERVIEW

Panasonic G6 Color Profiles

Today I shot a grey/color chart with the Panasonic G6 and the 12-35mm at different picture settings with manual in-camera white balance.

Here you can download white balance presets for Resolve based on each of the exported settings after I adujsted the grey chart shots for each possible picture setting at 0 0 0 0. Maybe this could be handy when you were able to control the lighting but did not bring a greycard to your set.

Based on the dynamic range that is visible on the grey chart, I’d choose NATURAL or PORTRAIT as a base for my future projects. Comparing the color charts I find the reds in PORTRAIT much more present compared to NATURAL.

VIVID grey chart details

VIVID grey chart details

VIVID grey chart

VIVID grey chart

VIVID color chart details

VIVID color chart details

VIVID color chart

VIVID color chart

STANDARD grey chart details

STANDARD grey chart details

STANDARD grey chart

STANDARD grey chart

STANDARD color chart details

STANDARD color chart details

STANDARD color chart

STANDARD color chart

SCENERY grey chart details

SCENERY grey chart details

SCENERY grey chart

SCENERY grey chart

SCENERY color chart details

SCENERY color chart details

SCENERY color chart

SCENERY color chart

PORTRAIT grey chart details

PORTRAIT grey chart details

PORTRAIT grey chart

PORTRAIT grey chart

PORTRAIT color chart details

PORTRAIT color chart details

PORTRAIT color chart

PORTRAIT color chart

NATURAL grey chart details

NATURAL grey chart details

NATURAL grey chart

NATURAL grey chart

NATURAL color chart details

NATURAL color chart details

NATURAL color chart

NATURAL color chart

ISO Comparison GH2 vs. G6 vs. GH3

As long as I still have the three beauties from Panasonic at home, I thought about doing a comparison to decide which one I’ll keep, and because some others may ask themselves a similar question: Here it is, the first excerpt of my comparison experiments:

All Shots are done with the Panasonic 20mm f1.7 at f3.2 with shutter speed set to1/25th at AVCHD 24p, Standard picture profile at 0 0 0 0 and manual WB 10000K.

The GH2 is hacked with Driftwood’s T7 Moon high bitrate hack. And because Nick Driftwood recommends it for 24p video, the GH2 uses i.Dynamic at LOW.
G6 and GH3 have intelligent settings disabled.

I found it very hard to match the cameras via their color profiles so I decided to use STD 0000 on all of them.

For post production in After Effects and Premiere, I decided to convert all shots to DNxHD first.
Sorry for the poor white balance, but I just had one LED spot that was dimmable and no proper video light. I then decided to leave it as it is and did not apply any color grading in post.

I’m going to publish a comparison at ISO 800 with some more individually optimized settings on each camera and – as far as my skills go – some optimization in post.

 

Panasonic G6 – noise and grain

Compared to the hacked GH2 I almost fell off my chair looking at the footage of my newly bought Panasonic G6 because there was heavy grain.

I figured out that setting i.Dynamic to “high”, like I knew it from the hacked GH2, caused most of the noise. Turning this off increased the image quality a lot.

Depending on how deep you’d like to digg in post production, you can set noise reduction to 0 or -1 and use some of the in camera noise reduction. I also encountered good results with NR set to -3 and optional post processing.

Currently using STD -3 -3 -1 -3 with Panasonic lenses. STD 0 0 0 0 works well, too.
You can see a comparison of the two settings here:

A more detailed video on the G6 vs. GH2 (hacked) vs. GH3 will follow.

What test setups do you use and how do you measure exposure while testing different settings?
I find the in-camera exposure metering a little uncomfortable. Maybe I’ll try Zebra as orientation so I get the most light without overexposing.

“pci passthrough” howto

Aims

With this howto you got the chance to set up a Windows virtual machine that is capable of playing video games on a Linux host.
For additional information read “pci passthrough” vs. “vga passthrough” first. Also see the intro post for the hardware I use.

Prepare System

  • activate vt-d in your BIOS
  • set chipset video card to always on
  • install fresh _Ubuntu 12.04 (I chose XUbuntu)
    (For _Ubuntu 12.10 see additional information here.)

Installation

With installing Xen I followed the wonderful Ubuntu Community but I will tell you the important steps right here, too.
(I’m assuming you got root by sudo -i, so “sudo” is left out.)

Install and check the Xen kernel.

apt-get install xen-hypervisor-amd64
sed -i 's/GRUB_DEFAULT=.*\+/GRUB_DEFAULT="Xen 4.1-amd64"/' /etc/default/grub
update-grub
sed -i 's/TOOLSTACK=.*\+/TOOLSTACK="xm"/' /etc/default/xen
xm list

“xm list” should output something like “Domain-0″ representing your Dom0 (host) after a reboot with the Xen kernel.

Set network up. (You could also disable network-manager permanently if you like.)

apt-get install bridge-utils
/etc/init.d/network-manager stop

Change network configuration in /etc/network/interfaces.

auto lo
iface lo inet loopback

auto xenbr0
iface xenbr0 inet dhcp
    bridge_ports eth0

auto eth0
iface eth0 inet dhcp
/etc/init.d/networking restart

Create the volume group “virtual-machines” and add a 100GB volume. (sdb is an empty HDD without any partitions, you may change this as you need.)

vgcreate virtual-machines /dev/sdb
lvcreate -L 100G -n win7x64 virtual-machines

Get the addresses of the pci devices you want to pass through. (Here I’m directly grepping for USB and VGA devices.)
Note: For my HD7950 and other newer video cards you always need to get 2 pci addresses. I found out ’01:00.0′ by the following command and had to add ’01:00.1′ as well to my config file. I assume the second address is responsible for audio stuff.

lspci | grep VGA
lspci | grep USB

Save the following lines as /etc/xen/win7x64-hvm.cfg and change them as you like.

# nut sure if really needed
kernel="/usr/lib/xen-default/boot/hvmloader"

builder = "hvm"
name = "win7x64-hvm"

# RAM size in MB
memory = "4096"

# number CPU cores
vcpus = 2

vif = ['type=ioemu']

# boot from cd and hdd
disk = ['phy:/dev/virtual-machines/win7x64,hda,w','file:/home/user/images/WIN_7_PROFESSIONAL.iso,hdc:cdrom,r']
boot="dc"

# boot from hdd
#disk = ['phy:/dev/virtual-machines/win7x64,hda,w']
#boot="c" 

# enable remote vnc access until video card driver is installed
vnc = 1 

acpi=1
sdl=0
serial='pty'

# list your pci devices (HD7950,HD7950,USB)
pci=['01:00.0','01:00.1','00:1a.0']

Enable pciback module.

modprobe xen-pciback

Create the following bash script to reassign your PCI devices to the virtual machine/pciback and execute it.

remove_device () {
BDF=$1
# Unbind a PCI function from its driver as necessary
[ ! -e /sys/bus/pci/devices/$BDF/driver/unbind ] || \
echo -n $BDF > /sys/bus/pci/devices/$BDF/driver/unbind
# Add a new slot to the PCI Backend's list
echo -n $BDF > /sys/bus/pci/drivers/pciback/new_slot
# Now that the backend is watching for the slot, bind to it
echo -n $BDF > /sys/bus/pci/drivers/pciback/bind
}

#usb controller
remove_device "0000:00:1a.0"
#HD 7950
remove_device "0000:01:00.0"
remove_device "0000:01:00.1"

Create and start your vm.

xm create /etc/xen/win7x64-hvm.cfg

Install vncviewer and connect to the virtual machine.

apt-get install vncviewer

vncviewer localhost:0

Install Windows, video card driver, connect 2nd screen to passed video card and reboot the vm.

I advice you to change the config file and exclude the CD image so the vm is only booting from hdd.

To get the network working you may need to install XEN Windows drivers located here. (additional info)

Results

I don’t like excessive benchmarking but here are some facts about the system.

Team Fortress 2 at 300FPS on High.

Windows7 performance index. (HDD score may be improved by directly passing the SATA controller as well.)
Leistungsindex Windows7 PCI Passthrough XEN

Fixes & Tipps

If you get an error like “device not ready for commands” open the qemu log.
The error “couldn’t find keymaps/en-us” could be fixed by creating the following symlink.

ln -s /usr/share/qemu-linaro /usr/share/qemu

If you are told that a specific pci address has to be assigned to the same guest as another you are probably missing the second pci address of your video card. (see “Get the addresses of the pci devices you want to pass through.” on above)

For the people out there who tried this howto: I’d totally love to hear how it is going and if this howto needs an update.

Links

  • https://help.ubuntu.com/community/XenProposed
  • http://wiki.ubuntuusers.de/Logical_Volume_Manager
  • http://phoronix.com/forums/showthread.php?57068-Xen-VGA-passthrough-is-the-way-to-go!!! (beginning at page 6 or 7)

“pci passthrough” vs. “vga passthrough”

If you have multiple video cards and you want to use one for your Dom0 aka host and the others for your VM, “PCI Passthrough” is the path to take because it is way easier to setup. In conclusion this is what I will try first because I have my HD7950 and the i7 integrated Intel 2000.

On the other hand if you just have one video card (e.g. in a laptop) you have to deal with a little patching and kernel compiling to get your video card to the client. Maybe I will try this later on even though I do not need to.

new project “vga/pci passthrough” – requirements

In my new project “vga/pci passthrough” aka “bye dualboot” I’ll set up a virtual machine using KVM or XEN containing Windows XP or 7 as guest OS under a debian based Linux as host.
Nothing extraordinary new until now, so I add PCI Passthrough for the graphics card, USB controller (keyboard/mouse) and maybe SATA/HDD.

This will hopefully result in a virtual machine on which playing windows games works like a charm and what is easyly managable (backup, copy, move).

There are two ways of realizing this:

  1. IOMMU (AMD)
  2. VT-D (Intel)

I choose Intel’s VT-D technology because they provide awesome VT-D µATX mainboards and I like small desktop setups. In the case space does not matter I would have chosen the AMD FX-8120 with an ATX board because it is awesome for virtualization and way cheaper than the Intel i7 processors in that category.
So this is my setup:

  • CPU: Intel Core i7-2600
  • Mainboard: Intel DQ67SW
  • Graphics: Radeon HD 7950
  • RAM: 16GB Kingston ValueRAM DIMM
    (If you are interested in all of the hardware ask for it and I will tell you.)

Currently I’m sitting here waiting for the hardware to be shipped. So keep up, I’ll post my experiences and how-tos as soon as possible.